How To Hold A Handgun For Maximum Accuracy?

by Beny | Last Updated: December 19, 2020

Are you just getting started with handguns? or looking for a proper guide to know how to hold a handgun for maximum accuracy?

Well, I’ve got you covered. In today’s blog, I will be helping you with the tutorial on holding handguns properly.

Developing your handgun holding techniques will help you a lot in becoming a better shooter as well as from the self-defense point of view.

Handgun Techniques

There is a lot of things you need to take care of while holding a handgun, It’s not just picking it up and shooting. You need to know the methods that are required before you go for your first shot.

Grip

Just to make these things simple, I will be making them into simple points.

These things require some practice and once you have done it a couple of times, you will see a difference in the accuracy.

Stance

If you want to make the most of your shot, you have to stabilize your stance which will help you in better sight alignment, trigger access, and recoil control. You need to figure out among several stances which one you are more comfortable with.

Isosceles

The most natural stance is the Isosceles, It is a two-hand stance for handgun shooting. The face will be towards the target squarely with your feel and shoulder-width apart. You will be holding your gun directly in front of your eyes with both of the arms at full extension.

It is also one of the fastest stances which can help in an emergency like situation.

Weaver

The one which I always recommend is the Weaver stance, It is known to be first used by Jack Weaver, who was the deputy Sheriff of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s department during a pistol competition in the last 1950s.

Aim

The second thing which is most important for better accuracy while shooting is the AIM.

You have to pay close attention to get the most accurate shot, I have some aiming techniques which helped me personally for improving my precision.

Always remember to be slow and steady when you are learning how to aim properly, if you are speed shooting then if will hamper your accuracy for sure.

 

How Do Triggers Work?

Increasing accuracy is all about knowing everything about your Gun, and the most important is the trigger. You need to know how exactly a trigger works.

The trigger which you pull on your gun is a lever that trips another lever, which is called the sear. It holds the hammer back until enough pressure is applied to fire the handgun.

You will find that most handguns today have double-action triggers that directly cock the hammer and fire a shot when pulled.

You need to know about Trigger Management, which is the method of controlling your trigger when shooting. This skill will require a lot of practice and patience but once you finally get control of your trigger. You will feel how useful it is and how it can help you in improving your accuracy.

Now, You will be like how to improve my trigger management skills?

You can improve your trigger management skills by dry firing without wasting bullets. I will recommend you to stand in front of a full-length mirror to confirm your stance and then dry firing. It sounds silly but will help you for sure.

 

Safety

Safety is essential when handling any firearms, including handguns. The first and most common rule of gun safety is to always treat a gun as if it’s loaded. This prevents accidental discharge or malfunction and can save a life.

Always keep your finger off of the trigger until you are ready to shoot. This best practice also avoids accidental discharge, harm to others, or personal injury.

How Not To Hold a Handgun

Another critical part of safety is correctly holding your pistol. Avoid holding the gun too low. You have much less control over the recoil the lower you hold your gun.

For two-handed grips, there are a few don’ts that will save you time and frustration when practicing. Believe me, I’ve made all of these mistakes while trying to perfect my stance and grip.

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